Walnut, Lentil and Quinoa Salad Wrap with Spicy Miso-Cashew Dipping Sauce

This wrap is delicious. Make it. Eat it. Feel good.

Even though the weather is cooling down in the southern hemisphere and warming up in the northern hemisphere, this wrap is perfect for all seasons because it has some warming ingredients like chili, miso, walnuts and lentils and cooling, raw vegetables. Have it for lunch or serve it as an appetizer. It’s a delicious, nutrient-packed dish. Lentils are the perfect protein boost, a complex carbohydrate, high in fibre and low in fat. And, we all love quinoa because quinoa is blah blah blah blah blah…

Recipe:

  • quinoa 200g
  • lentils 80g
  • pumpkin 200g
  • sprouts 120g
  • walnuts 40g
  • cherry tomatoes 16 pc
  • bok choy 40g
  • vietnamese rice paper wrap
  • get a freaking kitchen scale

The only cooked ingredients are the quinoa and lentils. Cook each separately until um, cooked. Salt them, too. Nothing worse than unseasoned lentils. If you are feeling particularly affectionate towards clove, throw some in with the lentils as they cook. I find it morally questionable to cook beans and lentils without clove. They are God’s little heat missiles, warming up the extremities and adding general joy to the oral cavity. Good luck fishing them out, though. Or, if you are serving them to anyone you don’t feel a horrible affection towards, leave them in.

After the quinoa and lentils are cooked, drained and cooled, combine with with the rest of the ingredients. You want to grate the raw pumpkin (yes, yes, you can eat pumpkin raw and you really should), quartered cherry tomatoes, roughly torn bok choy leaves, roughly chopped sprouts (have you ever been able to bite into a long-ass sprout without completely unraveling your wrap or your dignity? No? I didn’t think so. Rough chop). Finally, rough chop the walnuts and throw them in, too.

Preparing the rough chop the sprouts

If you are not deft with handling gooey, sticky, temperamental rice paper wraps that simply collapse into a sticky heap in under 1 minute, then stop here and simply eat the salad out of the bowl, after adding this insanely delicious miso sauce. If you can handle rice wraps then lay one out on your board, using your palms, lightly rub them down with wet hands. Lay them back down again and spoon a few spoonfuls into the middle of the wrap, then say a prayer to the rice paper gods and start wrapping. Here’s a helpful video using the soaking method:

Sawse Recipe: (see how I made it rhyme with “bawse”? Cos this sawse truly is bawse.

  • cashew 200g
  • miso 40g
  • liquid amino 12g
  • lemon juice 8g
  • maple syrup 18g
  • thai chili 4g

Soak the cashew for 8 hours. This removes the thick starch, phytic acid (which inhibits digestion) and dodgy black dust from transportation. After soaking, rinse well a few times. Next, add the cashew to a blender and process with the rest of your ingredients unto smooth and silky. Liquid amino is a soy sauce substitute that is also gluten free and way more delicious than soy sauce. Easily discoverable at any organic store or the treasure troves of online supermarkets.

fearful encounter with wraps

This is a large amount of sauce. Portion and freeze. It will last three months in the freezer, 5 days in the fridge and 1 second on your lips. Hopefully, it will last 32 seconds in your oral cavity before it plummets into the digestive chamber because you know, chewing food properly is the second phase of digestion, the first being smelling the food. Prevent bloat and gas by chewing your food. Also, don’t talk with your mouth full because that is quite unpleasant to look at. Finally, be a good human and just make this goddamn recipe.

PS: plating suggestion in picture.

Sprouted Buckwheat Quinoa Chocolate Truffles

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Always wanting to eat healthier without sacrificing indulgence is why I made these. They have a lot of powerful foods in them and to be honest, I didn’t dig it. If you’re a woman, you’ll understand that sometimes you want tart, sour tastes in your mouth and at other times, you can’t stand it.

When I made these, I couldn’t stand the sour and I couldn’t feel the chocolate so I broke them down again into these:

photo 4 (1)

NOW, I am blissed out! It took a few days for me to want to transform them, and I’m glad I did because wasting ain’t great.

Recipe:
2 cups sprouted and dried buckwheat (must dry – they need to pop like rice crispies)
1/2 cup sprouted dried quinoa (same same)
1 William Pear, diced
1 cups of figs, diced
1/2 – 1 cup of raisins/ cranberries/ golden berries (bear in mind what your palate wants)
1/2 – 1 cup of dessicated coconut
1 cup of date paste (blend 2 cups dates with 1/4 – 1/2 cup water until it becomes a paste)
2 tbls coconut oil, melted
1/2 cup raw cacao powder

Give it a good mixing by hand then form into balls or line a glass container with plastic and press the mass neatly and evenly into the container, evening out the edges. If the mass is too dry, add more date paste or coconut oil. Cover and refrigerate.

photo 5 (1)

Chocolate Coating

1/2 cup raw cacao butter, melted

1 cup of raw cacao powder

1/4 – 1/2 cup honey/ maple (start slow, you don’t want a sugar overkill)

Whisk all three together the slowly pour over the mass that is pressed well into your glass container. Set in the fridge for a few hours or the freezer for 10 minutes. As you can see, the truffles are not covered with chocolate but if you want to, using a fork, dip the truffles into the chocolate and then set in the fridge again.

Fall/Winter Breakfast – Millet Porridge with Olive Oil and Clove-Baked Apples

P1040949Millet is an affordable, easily-sourced local grain in Taiwan that takes 10 minutes to cook and can be used as you would quinoa. In this breakfast idea, I’ve cooked the millet with toasted almonds, raisins and coconut sugar then added an apple that I rubbed in olive oil, sprinkled with pumpkin spice then dotted with whole cloves. It’s delicious, warming and has that nostalgic childhood essence to it. Enjoy.

Recipe:

1 apple, halved and cored

Here’s how to bake the apples.

In the link above, I used pears, so just use apples instead.

Millet Porridge

2 cups of millet

3 to 4 cups of water depending on how stewy you want your porridge

1 cup of flaked almonds (or more if you please, hazelnuts are an interesting substitute)

1 cup of raisins (or more if you please)

1/4 cup of coconut sugar (it isn’t very sweet at all, so start low and taste)

Place the millet in a pot and add the water. Let it cook for ten minutes or more until it’s al dente. In a separate pan, toast the flaked almonds. Once browned, drop them into the cooked millet pot along with the raisins and coconut sugar.

Spoon out the porridge into breakfast bowls. Place the baked apple in the middle and enjoy whilst warm.