Delicious Taipei’s Menu Consultancy Project at Me:Liu Art Gallery

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Delicious Taipei was invited to present and teach 2 raw dishes for the menu of Taichung art gallery, Me:Liu 彌留. We were thrilled to have the opportunity to showcase two exquisite dishes and honoured that an establishment as sophisticated as … Continue reading

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Consultancy at Metro Bodhi

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I served this at a dinner for 18 Buddhist teachers who fell in love with it so much that they asked me to teach the chefs at their restaurant, 一沙一塵MetroBodhi how to cook this. This dish, along with two others they liked haven’t made it onto the menu as yet. I will have to go back and re-teach as the teachers still need to get the hang of it.

The chefs and I in the kitchen

The chefs and I in the kitchen

This dish is devilishly easy but so delicious, anyone tasting it would imagine you spent hours perfecting it. I got it off the website of a great Indian chef. Sanjeev Kapoor. I love his recipes. I loved the idea of beets because first, I NEED them and secondly, you don’t much of beets in Indian cooking. My intention was to show the Buddhist teachers a new way to experience Indian food. I’m tired to hell with the typical, commercialised, washed down dishes of palak paneer, and whatever khorma are selling at the below average Indian restaurants at above average prices in Taipei.

When imagining the flavour, think about peppery mustard, nutty chana and earthy curry leaves.

Here’s how:

1 large beet, cut into cubes (yeah, you can in Taipei;) Mr. Kapoor’s original recipe asks for 3 – 4 small ones

Your favourite cooking oil – enough to stir fry

1/2 tsp mustard seeds (I use 1 tsp)

2 tsp chana dhal (I use more, I’m pretty full-on:D)

2 red chili, split length ways, insides removed

10 – 12 curry leaves (is life possible without curry leaf?)

salt

Now the original recipe asks for 1/4 cup coconut but I don’t dig coconut in food unless it’s Thai so I substituted a nice, dark balsamic to add a but of tartness. If you’re inclined towards coconut, go for it.

1 tbls chopped cilantro (I would freshly chopped mint and basil for some complexity)

Heat the oil in a pan, add the mustard seed. Once they start dancing around like Freddy Mercury is singing right next to you, add your chana dhal. I had no idea one could fry chana. This was a very exciting discovery for me. Stir for a bit then add curry leaves and chili and inhale! My word! Curry leaf is just heaven! Add beets and salt, cover and cook. I like my beets to be a bit crunchy so I won’t cook them right through. Once cooked, add balsamic or coconut and cilantro/ basil/ mint.

Beets Porial in the pan

Beets Porial in the pan

Metro Bodhi - really lovely, modern, clean vegetarian food

Metro Bodhi – really lovely, modern, clean vegetarian food

Great olive oil, vinegars and honey selection

Great olive oil, vinegars and honey selection

Here’s some info on curry leaf: Curry tree – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bon appétit!

Bon appétit!